Montana’s 9/11 Memorial at City College

2018 Memorial Observance
7:30 a.m.

City College MSUB Campus
  • Presentation of Colors
    MSUB Army ROTC Cadets
  • Welcome
    MSUB Chancellor Dan Edelman
  • 9/11 First Responder Scholarship presentation
    Kristin Peterman, Director, Center for Engagement
  • Statements from Montana State Leadership
    Senator Steve Daines
    Molly Bell, Senator Tester’s Office
    Mike Waters, Congressman Gianforte’s Office
  • Keynote Speaker
    Mayor Bill Cole
  • Laying of the Wreaths
    City College Students and Faculty Veterans
  • Sixty Seconds of sirens
    First Responders from Billings and Lockwood
  • Taps
    Tyler Hancoop,  MSUB music student

»»Download 2018 event program

 


 

»» 9/11/11 Memorial Dedication Program

»» 9/11/12 Remembrance Ceremony
»» 9/11/13 Remembrance Ceremony


NEWS

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The development of Montana’s 9/11 Memorial at City College has been a true community effort. Born from an idea of faculty members from City College at Montana State University Billings, work on the memorial began in December 2010 when the University sought approval for the award of a piece of the destroyed World Trade Center.

 

That 612-pound piece of steel I-beam now serves as the centerpiece of the memorial. The piece arrived in Billings in May 2011 and ground was officially broken on July 15, 2011.  

 

Over the course of the summer, work was completed. Along with Drafting and Design Program and Welding Program faculty and the University Facilities Services, volunteers from across the community worked to make the project a reality.  

 

Set on a 40-foot diameter concrete pad, the 4,150 square-foot memorial features benches for personal reflection. At the center is a 12-foot diameter raised platform on which the I-beam rests. Rising above the I-beam are two 16-foot steel tube towers, a scaled-down replica of the World Trade Center towers that fell on 9/11.

 

The memorial now stands as a stead-fast witness to the memory of those who lost their lives on that landmark day 17 years ago. Visitors to the memorial can reflect not only on the historical significance of 9/11 but also on the sacrifices made by true heroes--the firefighters, first responders and service-oriented professionals--who work in our communities on a daily basis. It also provides a place of reflection and honor for those who serve others in any other capacity from military service to volunteering in the community.  

 

These are the lessons that Montana State University Billings and our community partners wish to preserve and impart to the next generation of Montanans:  


Remember that 9/11 changed America and the course of our history forever and made us more aware of our responsibilities as citizens.  

 

Reflect on how communities can come together in time of need and how everyday heroes emerge when called upon. 

 

Educate by providing venues for making sense of complex questions and current issues. Be reminded that such events unify us and help us transcend differences of race, religion, social status and political affiliation.

 

Dedicate oneself to inspiring others to value citizenship and civic engagement. Memories can be honored through service to others.